Go to Homepage
Blog
330 East Kilbourn Avenue, Suite 1170
Milwaukee, WI 53202
Gimbel, Reilly, Guerin & Brown, LLP

EmailEMAIL US

Phone414-271-1440

Milwaukee gun crime defense attorney

By Attorney Max Stephenson

Issues related to child custody are often the most difficult part of a divorce. Parents must learn to balance not wanting to live under a different roof than their children and wanting the best for their kids. Determining the best way to address these issues can be challenging for a judge to determine. They must look at every facet of the child’s life and factor in each parent’s ability to meet a child’s needs. In most situations, parents will have shared or joint custody of their children. In these cases, parents will share in the right to make decisions about how to raise their children, and the children will typically spend significant amounts of time with each parent.

...

Milwaukee WI parent child relocation attorneyIf you are a divorced parent, moving will likely be more complicated than finding a new home and packing up a moving van. That is because there are certain laws that apply when a divorced parent wants to move with their children to a new location.

In Wisconsin, the parental relocation laws were updated in April 2018. The new law provides that if both parents are granted any period of physical placement with a child, and one parent seeks to move with the child at least 100 miles away from the other parent, then the relocating parent must request permission for the move with the court.

The request to the court must include the following information: 

...

Milwaukee family law attorneys, child custody rights, non-parent custody, legal guardianship, parental responsibilitiesDecisions about the custody and placement of children are often a factor in divorce proceedings or in cases where parents are unmarried. However, there are also situations where someone other than a child’s parents are closely involved in raising children. Non-parents who wish to obtain child custody rights for children in their care should be sure to understand how Wisconsin law applies to their situation.

Child Custody for Non-Parents

When making decisions about child custody, Wisconsin courts will act in the best interests of the child. In some cases, custody may be awarded to a child’s relative if the court finds that “neither parent is able to care for the child adequately or that neither parent is fit and proper to have the care and custody of the child.” Eligible relatives may include grandparents, aunts, uncles, stepparents, cousins, or siblings.

...

Posted on in Family Law

establish paternity, Milwaukee paternity lawyer, parental rights, unmarried parent, Voluntary Paternity AcknowledgementA child deserves to have a relationship with and receive support from both parents, whether his or her parents are married or unmarried. In cases when parents are not married at the time of a child’s birth, or when the identity of the child’s father is in question, it is important to follow the proper legal procedures to establish paternity. This will ensure that a child’s parents can exercise their parental rights and that the child will receive the financial support he or she needs from both parents.

Methods of Establishing Paternity

Wisconsin law recognizes three ways to establish paternity: 

...

Milwaukee, WI divorce lawyers, Wisconsin child custody case, child custody case, Wisconsin family law, divorcing parentsDuring a divorce, disputes about how parents will divide responsibility for their children and where children will live can be highly contentious. When divorcing parents in Wisconsin are working to make decisions about their children, it is important to understand how the state’s child custody laws affect these matters.

Legal Custody and Physical Placement

Wisconsin law divides decisions about child custody into two categories: legal custody and physical placement. Legal custody involves the right to make decisions about a child’s care and upbringing, including the medical care he or she receives, where he or she will go to school, the choice of religion, and permission to obtain a driver’s license, join the military, or get married. Physical placement (also known as visitation) refers to the time a child spends in each parent’s care.

...
Back to Top