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fake id in wisconsin, milwaukee criminal defense lawyerDrinking alcohol under age 21 as well as using a fake ID that states you are of age, is illegal. Fake ID charges can have far-reaching consequences and should be taken seriously. Those who are underage should be aware that mere possession of a fake ID—even if it belonged to an older sibling—is a crime. It is also a crime to present the fake ID to a bar, restaurant, or store in Wisconsin

Penalties Under Wisconsin Law

If it is proven beyond a reasonable doubt that you possessed or used a fake ID, you could face several penalties. Wisconsin law provides for a fine of $300 to $1,250, suspension of driving privileges for 30 to 90 days, community service, or any combination of these penalties. Exactly what sentence you receive will depend on the judge, your criminal history, and the severity of the offense. For example, if you were buying significant amounts of alcohol or were extremely inebriated at the time of your arrest, you may face harsher penalties. 

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cyberbullying crimes in wisconsin, milwaukee criminal law attorneyBullying is defined as behavior that is intended to cause intimidation, fear, or harm to others. "Cyberbullying" is a relatively new term for the same maltreatment except that it is perpetrated through the Internet or text messages. Cyberbullying may involve criminal charges in Wisconsin. If the accused is found guilty of a crime, fines and/or jail time may be imposed. 

Examples of Cyberbullying 

Due to the proliferation of Internet-enabled devices and social media platforms, there are numerous ways cyberbullying can occur, including: 

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teen drug use in wisconsin, Milwaukee criminal defense lawyerA recent study shows that the use of many illegal substances is down among U.S. teens. The only substance that did not see a decline in usage was marijuana, which remained stable. Conducted by the National Institute of Health (NIH), the results are based on the Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey of teenagers in the eighth, tenth and twelfth grades. Public health officials are encouraged by the findings and believe that consistent and fact-based public service campaigns have contributed to the declining numbers.

Alcohol and Cigarette Use Declines

The number of teens who reported that they have “been drunk” in the past year are at the lowest point ever in the MTF survey’s history.  In 2016, 37.3 percent of high school seniors reported in the survey as being drunk at least once. This number peaked in 2001, when 53.2 percent of seniors reported that they had been drunk at least once in the previous year.

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