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Milwaukee, WI criminal defense lawyer for computer crimesBy Patrick Knight, Ray Dall’Osto & Jason Luczak

Computer and digital technology is constantly changing and ever-expanding. As a result, certain types of activities that might not seem problematic at the time could end up causing serious legal problems. State laws governing theft, and its civil cousins misappropriation and conversion, have expanded to include unauthorized possession, use and misuse of computers and digital information, the internet, use of identity, and capturing and sharing images.  

Internet crimes are ever-increasing and the definitions applied and consequences change rapidly, with the sentences more and more retributive. Known collectively as computer crime laws, these statutes cover a wide scope of activities, and violations of these laws can result in a broad range of criminal penalties. In addition to criminal charges, these crimes and activities can also form the basis for restitution claims and large money damage lawsuits, which include punitive and treble damages.

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cyberbullying crimes in wisconsin, milwaukee criminal law attorneyBullying is defined as behavior that is intended to cause intimidation, fear, or harm to others. "Cyberbullying" is a relatively new term for the same maltreatment except that it is perpetrated through the Internet or text messages. Cyberbullying may involve criminal charges in Wisconsin. If the accused is found guilty of a crime, fines and/or jail time may be imposed. 

Examples of Cyberbullying 

Due to the proliferation of Internet-enabled devices and social media platforms, there are numerous ways cyberbullying can occur, including: 

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computer-crimeIn recent years, law enforcement agencies across the United States and in Wisconsin have relentlessly pursued producers, possessors and distributors of child pornography. Individuals caught and charged with the sexual exploitation of children or possession and/or distribution of child pornography could potentially be prosecuted under state or federal laws, or even both.

Between 1996 and 2005, the Federal Bureau of Investigation reported that the amount of child pornography and sexual exploitation cases opened by the agency skyrocketed from 114 to 2,402, and arrests related to these charges per year increased from 68 in 1996 to 1,649 in 2005. Within this 10-year period alone, the amount of cases opened and arrests made by the Federal Bureau of Investigation increased over 2,000 percent.

Penalties for Child Pornography

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Posted on in Criminal Defense

Wisconsin criminal defense attorney, Wisconsin defense lawyer, identity theftFrom laptops to smartphones, computers have become a ubiquitous part of nearly everyone's lives. People commonly joke that people have more computing power in their pockets today than NASA did when landing someone on the moon. As much as computers are helpful in everyday life, they have also created a new vulnerability, computer crime. Computer thieves,  who are commonly referred to as hackers or crackers, can lift a person's account data out of a computer from across the country. Even massive, well-funded corporations like Sony can be targeted by such attacks. This sort of crime required a new type of law to protect against it. To that end, Congress passed the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act in 1986, and have updated it six times over the years in order to better suit the rapidly changing technological landscape.

What Computer Crime Looks Like

The reason the law has been updated so many times is because there are so many different types of cyberattacks and vulnerabilities that hackers can exploit. Some of them are highly technical, like ARP poisoning. ARP poisoning is a technique by which a hacker can insert their computer in between the target computer and the router. This lets the attacker watch everything happening over the target's internet.

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