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Milwaukee criminal defense law firmMilwaukee, WI criminal defense attorneyBy Attorney Cameron G. Weitzner and Paralegal Rachel A. Sweet

Getting arrested or charged with a crime can be extremely frightening and stressful, and it may feel like you have nowhere to turn for help and support. However, thanks to the Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution, there is always at least one person whom you can rely on: your attorney. Among other rights, the Sixth Amendment guarantees a criminal defendant the right to “the assistance of counsel for his defense.” If you are facing charges, you should be sure to understand the full extent of the protection that this clause provides.

What Does the Right to Legal Counsel Include?

The Sixth Amendment right to legal counsel means that in a trial or court hearing related to the charges you are facing, you have the right to representation from a qualified defense attorney. Your attorney can take many important actions to protect your rights and help you avoid conviction or an unfair sentence. For example, they can speak on your behalf in opening and closing arguments, help you present evidence and testimony to demonstrate your innocence, cross-examine witnesses for the prosecution, and object to inadmissible evidence and improper trial procedure.

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Milwaukee criminal defense law firmMilwaukee, WI multiple OWI attorneyBy Attorney Cameron Weitzner and Paralegal Rachel Sweet

Operating while intoxicated (OWI) is a serious criminal offense, regardless of whether you have a prior history of convictions. Consequences of an OWI conviction include fines, driver’s license revocation, and a lasting criminal record, even for first-time offenders. However, the consequences can become much more severe if you are facing OWI charges a second, third, or subsequent time. If you are arrested for OWI with a previous conviction on your record, it is crucial that you hire an attorney who can help you avoid the full extent of the penalties you may face.

Second OWI Offense Penalties Depend on the Timeframe

In Wisconsin, if your second alleged OWI offense comes more than 10 years after your first conviction, the potential penalties will likely be the same as if you had no prior conviction. Namely, you may face a fine of up to $300, a $435 OWI surcharge, and revocation of your driver’s license for up to nine months, but you are unlikely to be sentenced to any period of confinement or imprisonment. However, if the second offense comes within 10 years of the first, the possible penalties become more substantial. Fines can increase to up to $1,100, the license revocation period can increase to up to 18 months, and the sentence can include up to six months in prison.

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Milwaukee criminal defense lawyer for state or federal fraud chargesBy Attorney Cameron Weitzner

The term “fraud” is used to refer to a wide variety of criminal offenses, many of which can result in serious consequences under either Wisconsin state law or federal law, depending on the circumstances. If you are facing allegations of any form of criminal fraud, you need an experienced criminal defense attorney who can provide strong representation and guidance to help you understand your options.

Fraud Crimes in Wisconsin

In Wisconsin, many forms of fraud are classified as crimes against property, specifically under the category of misappropriation, meaning the unlawful use of another person’s property, assets, or identity. Some examples of fraudulent offenses include:

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Milwaukee civil litigation attorneyMilwaukee fraud lawyerBy Ray Dall’Osto and Chris Hayden

The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires each of the nationwide credit reporting companies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — to provide individuals with a free copy of their credit report, at their request, once every 12 months. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act of March 2020 also gives consumers some credit protections. It dictates how companies that send data to the credit bureaus will report accounts for which consumers have payment accommodations in place. If a consumer has an accommodation, and they live up to their end of the deal, an account that had been current previously will continue to be reported that way for both account status and payment history, assuming compliance with the accommodation. A consumer can also ask lenders to add a code to their credit report to indicate that they were “affected by a natural or declared disaster.”

The Federal Trade Commission announced in May 2020 that an agreement has been reached with the nationwide credit reporting companies to allow for free, weekly credit reports, not just one free report per year. Given the increase in the number of scams and frauds that are accompanying the coronavirus pandemic (e.g., fraudulent unemployment compensation applications using hacked personal information), individuals should be more careful, and they can now make themselves better aware, by more frequently checking their credit histories at the official website noted below.

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Milwaukee, WI domestic battery defense lawyerBy Attorney Nicole Masnica

According to the Wisconsin Department of Justice, nearly 30,000 domestic violence incidents were reported in 2017, and 21,000 arrests were made. Domestic abuse, as defined under Wis. Stat. § 968.075, involves a person intentionally inflicting pain or injury or committing sexual assault against a family member or causing a person to reasonably fear that these types of offenses would occur. Domestic violence may be committed against a spouse, a former spouse, an adult living in a person’s household, or an adult who a person shares a child with. 

Domestic Violence Charges

There are a variety of criminal charges that can be associated with domestic violence, including sexual assault, kidnapping, and homicide. However, battery is the most common charge that a person may face when accused of domestic violence, and it will typically fall into one of the three following categories:

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Milwaukee criminal defense attorney for pardon applications

By Raymond Dall’Osto, Brianna Meyer, and Jason Luczak

In June 2019, newly-elected Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers reversed the eight-year moratorium on criminal pardons imposed by the former Governor Walker, who refused to issue pardons during his two terms in office. Governor Evers issued Executive Order #30, which reversed Walker’s unprecedented shutdown of executive clemency. This Order reopens an avenue of potential relief for those who have lost some of their rights due to a criminal conviction.

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Milwaukee, WI criminal law attorney for expungement

By Ray Dall’Osto

After passing the Wisconsin Assembly earlier this year as A.B. 33, the Wisconsin Senate adjourned this year’s legislative session, without taking action to approve the parallel bipartisan expungement bill pending before it, S.B. 39. The proposed expungement reform bill, which has long been supported by the State Bar of Wisconsin and was favorably considered in previous years and legislative sessions, would change state law involving getting a criminal record expunged. If passed by the Senate and signed by Governor Evers, the expungement reform bill will significantly help alleviate the negative impact a criminal record can have on individuals seeking employment, housing, volunteer work, and in other areas where the stigma of a conviction can pose a roadblock, even in cases where the crime was nonviolent, a misdemeanor or lower-class felony, and/or committed many years ago. 

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Milwaukee theft charges defense attorneyBy Attorney Brianna Meyer

The definition of theft varies greatly, and so do the offenses that fall under this category. From taking a candy bar from a store shelf to providing false receipts to obtain a loan, there are a wide range of theft charges that a person may face in Wisconsin. For those accused of shoplifting, it is important to know the charges that may be tied to retail theft, especially since they depend upon the value of the items that were allegedly stolen and the type of theft being alleged. 

What Are the Different Types of Shoplifting and Theft Charges?

Shoplifting, a.k.a. “Retail Theft”, includes more than just taking an item off the shelf. In fact, Wisconsin statutes list eight different ways in which a person’s actions can be considered retail theft. According to Wisconsin statute 943.50, a person can be penalized if they do any of these actions without a merchant’s consent and with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of possession of the item or the full purchase price of the item:

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Milwaukee gun crime defense attorney

By Brianna Meyer and Max Stephenson

In the wake of widespread mass shootings across the United States, advocates and lawmakers in many jurisdictions are pushing for new gun laws to curb gun violence. “Extreme Risk” or “Red Flag” laws are one type of new gun legislation that targets gun violence problems and have been enacted in several states.

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Milwaukee WI domestic abuse charges defense laywerFalse accusations of domestic violence are more common than one might think. They can be devastating to someone’s personal reputation and professional life. It is important to take these types of sensitive criminal charges seriously by hiring an experienced attorney who has defended clients against such accusations and understands the best way to proceed with a case. 

How Does the Law Define Domestic Violence?

While you may have an idea about what acts are commonly considered to be domestic violence by the general public, Wisconsin law specifies exactly what must transpire for a charge to be properly labeled as “domestic violence.”

Wisconsin State Statute 968.075(1) defines “domestic abuse" as any of the following engaged in by an adult person against his or her spouse or former spouse, against an adult with whom the person resides or formerly resided, or against an adult with whom the person has a child in common:

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