Milwaukee pedestrian accident attorneys, pedestrian injuriesAs the weather gets warmer, more people seek to travel on foot. However, it is important to keep in mind that pedestrians, especially children, face risks as they walk.

In fact, in the United States, a pedestrian is killed in a traffic accident every 113 minutes and hurt every eight minutes. Pedestrian accidents can leave victims severely injured, while car occupants may remain unharmed. Following pedestrian safety recommendations will help to reduce your risk; however, accidents still happen.

Common Types of Injuries Pedestrians Sustain

Pedestrians involved in accidents with a car are typically injured in the lower half of the body, which is where a car would first make impact. However, pedestrians can also sustain injuries to their head and upper body as they often fall into the vehicle that strikes them.

Children, because of their shorter stature, often sustain head trauma. Head trauma in children and adults is serious and requires a substantial amount of medical assistance simply to diagnosis the extent of the brain injury. Treatment and rehabilitation are typically required, and a full recovery is not guaranteed.

What to Do if You Get Into a Pedestrian Accident

If you are hit by a car as a pedestrian, you should take the following steps:

Contact a Milwaukee, WI, Pedestrian Accident Lawyer

Another step you should take is to call a personal injury attorney. These attorneys are familiar with traffic laws, medical conditions, and recovery for injuries.

An attorney can also explain to you how much your case is worth based on the extent of your injuries, the fault of the parties, and recent cases with similar facts. To get in touch with the Milwaukee pedestrian accident attorneys at Gimbel, Reilly, Guerin & Brown, LLP, call 414-271-1440.

Sources:

http://wisconsindot.gov/Pages/safety/education/pedestrian/default.aspx

https://www.cdc.gov/features/pedestriansafety/

http://wisconsindot.gov/Documents/safety/education/crash-data/bikeped-crash-2011-2013-exec.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2859736/